Energy Sources/Energy Mix By Country (Where Major Countries In The World Get Their Energy From)

Energy Sources/Energy Mix By Country (Where Major Countries In The World Get Their Energy From)

An country’s energy mix is a breakdown of the sources a country gets their energy from.

This is a simple guide that outlines and lists the energy mix in each major energy consuming country in the world.

 

Summary – Energy Sources & Energy Mixes In Different Countries

  • The countries in the headings below have been chosen to be featured as they are some of the biggest energy consumers in the world
  • Two of the biggest energy consumers in the world are China, and the United States
  • China consumes most of it’s energy from coal at 60.4%
  • The United States gets most of it’s energy production from Natural Gas at 31.8% and Petroleum at 28%
  • There is a difference between energy production and energy consumption, where produced energy can be consumed internally or exported, whereas consumed energy is consumed solely within the country (and can be produced inside or outside the country)
  • There is a difference between the energy production of a country (which might include both electricity and vehicle energy for example), and electricity production of a country (which is just electricity on it’s own)
  • Also note that there is a difference between total energy, and energy per capita/per person

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In United States

US primary energy production in 2017 was:

  • Natural Gas—31.8%
  • Petroleum (crude oil and natural gas plant liquids)—28.0%
  • Coal—17.8%
  • Renewable Energy—12.7%
  • Nuclear Electric Power—9.6%

– eia.gov

 

In 2018, the sources of electricity generation specifically were:

  • Natural gas – 35%
  • Coal – 27%
  • Nuclear Energy – 19%
  • Renewable energy sources – 17% (Hydropower 7%, Wind 7%, Biomass 2%, Solar 2%, Geothermal less than 1%)
  • Petroleum – less than 1%

– eia.gov

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In China

In 2017, China’s energy consumption breakdown was:

  • Coal – 60.4%
  • Crude Oil – 18.8%
  • Natural Gas – 7%
  • Renewables & Other – 13.8%

– chinapower.csis.org

 

In 2017, China’s electricity generation breakdown by source was:

  • Coal – 64.7%
  • Hydropower – 18.1%
  • Wind – 4.7%
  • Nuclear – 3.9%
  • Natural Gas – 3.2%
  • Other Thermal – 1.9%
  • Solar – 1.8%
  • Biomass – 1.2%
  • Pumped Storage Hydro – 0.5%

– wikipedia.org

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In India

A primary energy consumption breakdown in India in 2018 was:

  • Coal – 55.88%
  • Crude Oil – 29.55%
  • Natural Gas – 6.17%
  • Hydro Electricity – 3.91%
  • Renewable Power – 3.40%(excluding traditional biomass use)
  • Nuclear Energy 1.09% 

– en.wikipedia.org

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Russia

In 2018, the % share of energy consumption was:

  • Natural Gas – 54%
  • Oil – 21%
  • Coal – 12%
  • Nuclear – 6.4%
  • Hydro – 6.0%

– bp.com

 

In 2018, the % share of electricity generation was:

  • Natural Gas – 47%
  • Nuclear – 18%
  • Hydro – 17%
  • Coal – 16%
  • Oil – 1%

– bp.com

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Canada

Primary energy production by source in Canada in 2016 was:

  • Crude oil – 31%
  • Uranium – 32%
  • Natural gas – 24%
  • Hydro – 5%
  • Coal – 5%
  • Other Renewables – 3%
  • Natural Gas Liquids – 2%

– nrcan.gc.ca

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Japan

Japan’s primary energy consumption in 2015 was:

  • Petroleum and other liquids – 42%
  • Coal – 27%
  • Natural gas – 23%
  • Hydro – 5%
  • Other Renewables – 3%
  • Nuclear – Roughly 1%

– eia.gov

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Brazil

Brazil’s primary energy consumption in 2017 was:

  • Petroleum and other liquids – 46%
  • Hydroelectric power – 28%
  • Natural gas – 11%
  • Renewables – 8%
  • Coal – 6%
  • Nuclear – 1%

– eia.gov

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In South Korea

South Korea’s total primary energy consumption by fuel type in 2017 was:

  • Petroleum and other liquids – 44%
  • Coal – 29%
  • Natural gas – 14%
  • Nuclear – 11%
  • Renewable sources – 2%

– eia.gov

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Germany

German power production breakdown in 2018 was:

  • Renewables – 34.9% (wind onshore 14.3%, solar 7.2%, biomass 7%, wind offshore 3%, hydropower 2.6%, waste 1%)
  • Lignite/Brown Coal – 22.5%
  • Black Coal – 12.9%
  • Natural Gas – 12.9%
  • Nuclear – 11.8%
  • Other – 4.2%
  • Mineral Oil – 0.8%

– cleanenergywire.org

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In The UK

UK energy use by source in 2017 was:

  • Gas – 39%
  • Oil – 35.8%
  • Bioenergy – 8.3%
  • Nuclear – 7.9%
  • Coal – 5.3%
  • Wind, solar and hydro – 3%
  • Imports – 0.7%

– carbonbrief.org

 

Electricity generation in the UK in 2016 was:

  • Natural Gas – 42%
  • Coal – 9%
  • Other Fossil Fuels – 3.1%
  • Nuclear – 21% 
  • Renewables (wind, wave, marine, hydro, biomass and solar) – 24.5%

– energy-uk.org.uk

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Australia

In 2015, electricity generation by energy source was:

  • Coal – 73%
  • Natural Gas – 13%
  • Hydropower – 7%
  • Wind – 4%
  • Rooftop Solar – 2%
  • Bioenergy – 1%

– originenergy.com.au

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Saudi Arabia

In 2016, energy consumption by energy sources was:

  • Crude oil and petroleum liquids – 63%
  • Natural Gas – 37%

– eia.gov

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources In Italy

Gross energy production in Italy in 2014 was:

  • Natural Gas – 33.5%
  • Hydro – 21.5%
  • Coal – 15.5%
  • Solar – 8%
  • Other – remainder of the %

– wikipedia.org

 

Energy Mix & Energy Sources Worldwide 

  • In 2014, the share of world energy consumption for electricity generation by source was coal at 41%, natural gas at 22%, nuclear at 11%, hydro at 16%, other sources (solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, etc.) at 6% and oil at 4%. Coal and natural gas were the most used energy fuels for generating electricity.

– wikipedia.org

 

Read more about worldwide energy production and energy consumption stats at https://ourworldindata.org/energy-production-and-changing-energy-sources

 

Sources

1. https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/?page=us_energy_home

2. https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/index.php?page=electricity_in_the_united_states

3. https://chinapower.csis.org/energy-footprint/

4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_sector_in_China

5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_policy_of_India

6. https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/business-sites/en/global/corporate/pdfs/energy-economics/statistical-review/bp-stats-review-2019-russia-insights.pdf

7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electricity_sector_in_Russia

8. https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/energy-facts/energy-and-economy/20062#L2

9. https://www.eia.gov/beta/international/analysis.php?iso=JPN

10. https://www.eia.gov/beta/international/analysis.php?iso=BRA

11. https://www.eia.gov/beta/international/analysis.php?iso=KOR

12. https://www.cleanenergywire.org/factsheets/germanys-energy-consumption-and-power-mix-charts

13. https://www.carbonbrief.org/six-charts-show-mixed-progress-for-uk-renewables

14. https://www.originenergy.com.au/blog/about-energy/energy-in-australia.html

15. https://www.eia.gov/beta/international/analysis.php?iso=SAU

16. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_energy_consumption

17. https://ourworldindata.org/energy-production-and-changing-energy-sources

18. https://www.energy-uk.org.uk/our-work/generation/electricity-generation.html

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