Soils Found In Each State In North America, & What They’re Each Good For, Or Used For

Soils Found In Each State In North America, & What They’re Each Good For, Or Used For

Each state in North America has a different soil that is dominant, or representative of that state.

Below we’ve quickly outlined where to find out more about these soils.

 

Soils Found In Each State In North America

Two places you can go to find out more about the soil that is representative of a particular state in the US are:

  • https://www.soils4teachers.org/state-soils
  • https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/edu/?cid=stelprdb1236841

 

What The Soils Found In North America Are Used For, What They’re Good For, & Their Limitations

The resources above outline things such as:

  • what the type of soil is that is found in a particular state
  • what that soil can be used for
  • what the soil might be good for
  • what limitations the soil might have
  • how the soil might be managed
  • + more

This information can be useful for farmers, people looking to move to a rural area and grow their own food, gardeners, and others.

 

Example Of Soil Found In A State

If we take Alabama for example, ‘Bama’ soil is:

  • … well suited to many uses including crop production, pasture for hay or animal grazing, forest, and most urban uses. Cotton, corn, soybean, and peanuts are the main cultivated crops …

– soils4teachers.org

 

Soil Can Still Differ From Location To Location Within A State – It Isn’t All The Same

Using the above Alabama state example, Bama soil isn’t found throughout the entire state:

  • The Bama soil is present in nearly 40% of Alabama counties

– soils4teachers.org

 

Representative soil is just the soil that is representative of that state. That doesn’t mean that that soil makes up 100% of soil in that state.

On a particular plot of land, you’ll still need to test or inspect the soil over the whole area of the land to make sure you know what that soil is on that piece of land – soil can differ from location to location even on one plot of land.

 

Sources

1. https://www.soils4teachers.org/state-soils

2. https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/edu/?cid=stelprdb1236841

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