Interesting & Important GMO Facts & Stats

Interesting & Important GMO Facts & Stats

Below we’ve compiled a list of some interesting or important GMO Facts & Stats.

These stats and facts might identify some principles around GMOs, but also identify some trends and connections within the industry or related industries.

 

Summary – GMO Stats & Facts

  • The US is the leading GMO growing country
  • Multiple countries have full or partial bans or restrictions on either the cultivation, or importation of GMO foods
  • Livestock consume most of the GMO crops we grow
  • Soybeans, cotton and corn are some of the crops that are grown with majority GMO seeds in some countries 
  • A very small number of companies (about 5 plus Monsanto) control the GMO seed market 
  • Monsanto can sell both Roundup herbicide and Roundup-resistant corn and soybeans to farmers, who must repurchase the seeds every year
  • Sales of the most popular herbicides have increased 15 fold since GMOs were first introduced
  • There is a scientific consensus that currently available food derived from GM crops poses no greater risk to human health than conventional food, but that each GM food needs to be tested on a case-by-case basis before introduction.

 

Interesting & Important GMO Facts & Stats

In 2016, the top growing countries of GMO crops (by area), were:

  1. USA – 72.9 Million Hectares
  2. Brazil – 49.1 Million Hectares
  3. Argentina – 23.8 Million Hectares
  4. Canada – 11.6 Million Hectares
  5. India – 10.8 Million Hectares

– bettermeetsreality.com

 

  • 26 countries had total or partial bans on GMOs in 2016, “including Switzerland, Australia, Austria, China, India, France, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Greece, Bulgaria, Poland, Italy, Mexico and Russia,” and … “significant restrictions on GMOs exist in about sixty other countries.”
  • In 2015, anti-GMO group Sustainable Pulse said that 38 countries ban the cultivation of GMO crops. The group’s list includes Algeria and Madagascar in Africa; Turkey, Kyrgyzstan, Bhutan, and Saudi Arabia in Asia; Belize, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela in South and Central America; and 28 countries in Europe.

– gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org

 

  • Globally, food-producing animals consume 70% to 90% of genetically engineered crop biomass, mostly corn and soybean. In the United States alone, animal agriculture produces over 9 billion food-producing animals annually, and more than 95% of these animals consume feed containing GE ingredients. The numbers are similar in large GMO producing countries with a large agricultural sector, such as Brazil and Argentina.

– forbes.com

 

  • 10% of the world’s croplands were planted with GM crops in 2010. 
  • In the US, by 2014, 94% of the planted area of soybeans, 96% of cotton and 93% of corn were genetically modified varieties. 
  • In recent years, GM crops expanded rapidly in developing countries.
  • In 2013, approximately 18 million farmers grew 54% of worldwide GM crops in developing countries.

– wikipedia.org

 

  • Genetically modified foods (GMOs) are something we’ve all likely eaten at least once
  • According to the US Department of Agriculture, GMOs account for 90% or more of the most common crops that are grown by American farmers.

– vittana.org

 

  • There are 5 other companies that, along with Monsanto, control nearly all of the GMO seed market. This include Sungenta, Dow Agrosciences, Bayer, BASF, and DuPont. This means a majority of corn and soybean products are not only profiting the farmer, but they are profiting companies as well.

– vittana.org

 

  • Biotech companies have certainly profited from GM crops, not least because seeds and genetic innovations can be patented. Monsanto, for instance, can sell both Roundup herbicide and Roundup-resistant corn and soybeans to farmers, who must repurchase the seeds every year.
  • The global market for genetically modified crops was estimated at $14.8 billion in 2012.

  • Studies differ on how this money is divvied up. One 2010 review estimated very roughly that somewhere around one-third of the total economic benefit of GM crop technology goes to seed and chemical companies. Another third accrues to US farmers. The remaining third is split between US consumers and the rest of the world:

– vox.com

 

  • [In 2008 Monsanto made] nearly as much on herbicide as it [did] on corn seeds. (Overall, the company expects to make $3.8 billion on seeds in ’08).

– gmwatch.org

 

  • More than 80% of all genetically modified crops grown worldwide have been engineered for herbicide tolerance. As a result, the use of toxic herbicides, such as Roundup®, has increased fifteenfold since GMOs were first introduced

– nongmoproject.org

 

  • There is a scientific consensus that currently available food derived from GM crops poses no greater risk to human health than conventional food, but that each GM food needs to be tested on a case-by-case basis before introduction.

– wikipedia.org

 

  • To date, more than 3,000 scientific studies have assessed the safety of these crops in terms of human health and environmental impact. These studies together with several reviews performed on a case-by-case from regulatory agencies around the world have enabled a solid and clear scientific consensus: GM crops have no more risk than those that have been developed by conventional breeding techniques.
  • In addition, there is also extensive literature that compiles the socioeconomic and environmental benefits that transgenic crops have reported in two decades of commercialization 

– geneticliteracyproject.org

 

 

Sources

1. https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonentine/2014/09/17/the-debate-about-gmo-safety-is-over-thanks-to-a-new-trillion-meal-study/#1c30b2e78a63

2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_organism

3. https://vittana.org/13-vital-pros-and-cons-of-gmos 

4. https://www.gmwatch.org/en/10-reasons-why-we-dont-need-gm-foods

5. https://www.vox.com/2014/11/3/18092770/who-profits-from-gmo-technology 

6. https://www.bettermeetsreality.com/list-of-gmo-foods-crops-grown-in-different-countries/ 

7. https://gmo.geneticliteracyproject.org/FAQ/where-are-gmos-grown-and-banned/ 

8. https://www.nongmoproject.org/gmo-facts/

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